Saturday, 20 May 2017

Seed Stitch Scarf

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If, like me, you prefer a scarf that doesn't have a right or wrong side, isn't gender specific and is snugly warm as the temperatures start to drop then this could be the perfect piece of knitting for you. This project began as a promise to one of my sons that I would make him a scarf before the university semester finished and here I sit joyful in the knowledge that with a mere week of studies left to go, I came through with the goods - a rare thing indeed when I make crafty promises.





My son had actually already chosen wool from my stash, but at the last minute I decided I needed that for something else I've been planning and so it was off to the city on a shopping mission to find a suitable yarn.  I'd like to make the point here that is is important to purchase enough for the project you are about to start, as about half way through I realised that I would need one more skein and so sent my husband on back to get more during his lunch break.  To say he was not thrilled is an understatement!  Armed with a photo of the label and a sample of yarn, hubby and the sales assistant spent a good while searching to make sure they had the right one before it was realised that the original purchase had been put under my name and they had a record of the yarn on their computer system. Yay for Morris and Sons


You will need:
4 skeins Morris 10ply Pure 50g hank (or equivalent) .  Colourway: Sooty
Size 5.5 knitting needles













Pattern

Cast on 35 stitches

Row 1 to 4:  Knit
Row 5: Knit 4, *P1, K1* continue from *to* across row until four stitches remain.  Knit 4
Row 5 forms pattern  until work 60in/150cm
Knit 4 rows.
Cast Off.
Sew in ends.


Happy Knitting

Deb

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Sunday, 7 May 2017

Knitted Neckerchief

Pin It Every year we like to take a little break that sees us traipsing across the country  to experience a little part of Australia that we have yet to discover.  Last year we headed over to South Australia and explored the delightful Barossa Valley, the German settlement of Hahndorf and then drove into Radelaide Adelaide to see what it had to offer.

Now, while many tourists head to the souvenir shops, we can be found picking through the shelves of every op shop/charity shop we pass along the way.  We have thought that at some point we could challenge ourselves and just pack underwear for the journey and purchase our clothing needs from our secondhand finds as we tour around.  On paper it seems like a great idea, but we're yet to be brave enough to actually put it into practise...maybe we'll try it this year!!

It's not only op shops where you'll find us though and when we visited the beach side suburb of Glenelg, as always it was very difficult to just walk on past the yarn shop and I was lured into the  inner sanctum of Barb's Sew and Knits as everyone else headed off to enjoy a frozen yogurt.  My purchase?  A stunning hand painted Misti Alpaca skein that I would surely put to good use at some point.

Fast forward fifteen months and with Mother's Day approaching it struck me that the beautiful colours could be just right for a special something for my Mum.

I'm a big believer in letting artisan yarns do all the work in a project so when there's great texture I tend to stick with something simple to bring out the quality and essence of the yarn.



For this project you will need:

1 x pair 12mm knitting needles
1 x pair 20mm knitting needles
1 x skein Misti Alpaca yarn or equivalent
Needle to sew in ends









Pattern



Using 12mm needles, cast on 34 stitches
Rows 1 to 3.  Knit
*Row 4.  Change to 20mm needles, knit
Row 5 Change to 12mm needles.  Knit
Row 6 to 7 knit.*

* to * forms pattern.

Continue pattern until a rectangle is formed and the skein is used with enough yarn left to cast off and sew.





To sew
Lay rectangle of knitted fabric on a flat surface.  Bring cast off edge across fabric and place on side seam of the start of the project (as shown) and sew together.












Embellish the sewn edge with matching buttons and sew in ends to finish.


Happy Knitting

Deb

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Tuesday, 25 April 2017

Cyclone Cook Cowl

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I recently had the pleasure for visiting New Zealand for the first time and it unfortunately coincided with the path of a cyclone.  What was I to do, but Google the nearest wool shop (the delightful Holland Road Yarn Company) and pick up enough supplies to see us through the eventful weather.



The cyclone thankfully turned out to be a bit of a non event in Wellington although that wasn't the case in the North, where there was widespread flooding and evacuations.  For the less affected though, it did gives a chance to take it easy and start crocheting.


The cowl that I came up with while we were bunkered down consists of a simple trellis stitch using beautiful 100% wool from New Zealand.

You will need:

1 x  3.75mm crochet hook (an odd size I know, but the yarn shop was out of 4mm, so feel free to substitute a different hook size)
3 x balls 50g Vintage New Zealand 8ply 100% wool (approx 104mts/114yds per 50g) in Porcelain.



Pattern:

Foundation Chain:  Chain 51

Row 1 - 1 x  single crochet into 6th chain from hook, *5 x chain, skip 3 chains in the foundation chain, 1 x single crochet into next chain.  Repeat from * to end and turn work.









Row 2 - * 5 x chain, 1 single crochet into the five chain arch of the previous row.  Repeat from * to end.  Turn

Repeat row 2  until work measures approx 170cm/66 inches.

Final row to join work:  *5x chain, 1 single crochet into five arch chain of Row 1 (first row of project) ensuring work is not twisted.  Repeat from * to end.  Weave in ends.


I managed to all but finish the cowl during our short stay in the land of the long white cloud, so it's definitely something that could be made in a weekend...hopefully you'll have better weather then our recent experience!

Happy crocheting

Deb

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Sunday, 18 September 2016

Drop Stitch Scarf for Beginners

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 A few months ago, the friendly folk at Lincraft asked if we'd like to come up with a project or two with their new season yarn, and to cut a long story short, we didn't say no!










                 


You can find our pattern Drop Stitch Scarf for Beginners over on the Lincraft blog.  It's a very easy pattern that produces a fabulous result.  Even if you're not a beginner knitter, this quick and simple project is something simple to do in between more complex knits.

Happy knitting

Deb and Louise
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Sunday, 11 September 2016

Classic Fingerless Mitts for the Discerning Lute Player

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Warming up
My son is a classical music student who lives in a cold house.   His early morning, before-work practise in the middle of winter can be a bit chilly.  Trying to keep his hands warm is proving to be a bit difficult and when he was over here on a visit recently, asked if I could knit some mitts that, if the need arose, he could take with him to performances.  This can only mean one thing - they have to be black.  No colours at all, just black! Plain ol' black.

I have been knitting a lot of fingerless mitts lately.  We all took a pair with us to the snow (did I say snow?  I meant rained out slush and ice and gravel) and whilst we didn't get to do any skiing or tobogganing, we did stay warm.

They are a very quick knit (even if the teeny tiny black stitches are a bit hard to see - I recommend sitting under a lamp).

Materials

50g Black sock yarn.
2.75mm DPN's (5)
Stitch marker
Wool needle
small piece of waste yarn.

Abbreviations

M1 - Make 1.  Using the RHS (Right hand side) needle, lift the 'bar' between the stitches and place on the LHS needle. Then knit into the back of the 'stitch' you have just created.  This makes a stitch.  Ensure that you knit into the back of the stitch.  This will twist the stitch.  If the stitch is not twisted, a small hole will be created.  
PM - place marker.  

Pattern

Cast on 80 stitches and divide evenly over 4 DPN's.

Establish a K2, P2 rib and continue for 11cm (or the desired length).

Left Hand Mitt

Row 1.      K14, (P2, K2)5 times, P2, K to end - ensure that your K2,P2 stitches in this and subsequent rows matches up with the established ribbing.
Row 2.      as Row 1.
Row 3.      M1, K1, M1, PM, K to established ribbing, (P2, K2) 5 times, P2, K to end.
Row 4.      K to established ribbing, (P2, K2) 5 times, P2, K to end.
Row 5.      M1, K3, M1, Slip marker, K to established ribbing (P2, K2) 5 times, P2, K to end.

Continue rows 4 and 5 until there are 19 stitches before the stitch marker.

Using the wool/tapestry needle, thread the waste yarn through the 19 stitches and secure by tying a knot.  Slip the stitches from the needle.  You will not be using these stitches until the end.

Next row.     K to established ribbing (ensure your first stitch is tight.  This is to ensure that there are no gaps when the thumb meets the mitt). (P2, K2) 5 times, P2, K to end.

Repeat this row for a further 6 cm.

Next row:     K to established ribbing, (P2, K2) to end.

Next row:     K2, P2 to end.

Continue ribbing for a further 4 cm.  Cast off.

Thumb 

Using 3 DPN's, pick up 8 stitches on the first needle, 8 stitches on the second needle and 3 on the last needle.  Using the 3rd needle, pick up an extra 3 stitches where the inside of the thumb meets the mitt.  Ensure that these stitches are tight so that no gaps form at this point.

Knit 4 rows.
Establish a K1, P1 rib for a further 4 rows and loosely cast off.

Weave in any loose ends.

Right Hand Mitt

Cast on 80 stitches and divide evenly over 4 DPN's.

Establish a K2, P2 rib and continue for 11cm (or the desired length).

Row 1.      K44, (P2, K2)5 times, P2, K to end - ensure that your K2,P2 stitches in this and subsequent rows matches up with the established ribbing.
Row 2.      as Row 1.
Row 3.      K to established ribbing, (P2, K2) 5 times, P2, K to last stitch, PM, M1, K1, M1
Row 4.      K to established ribbing, (P2, K2) 5 times, P2, K to end.
Row 5.      M1, K3, M1, Slip marker, K to established ribbing (P2, K2) 5 times, P2, K to marker, slip marker, M1, K3, M1

Continue rows 4 and 5 until there are 19 stitches before the stitch marker.

Using the wool/tapestry needle, thread the waste yarn through the 19 stitches and secure by tying a knot.  Slip the stitches from the needle.  You will not be using these stitches until the end.

Next row.     K to established ribbing (ensure your first stitch is tight.  This is to ensure that there are no gaps when the thumb meets the mitt). (P2, K2) 5 times, P2, K to end.

Repeat this row for a further 6 cm.

Next row:     K to established ribbing, (P2, K2) to end.

Next row:     K2, P2 to end.
Continue ribbing for a further 4 cm.  Cast off.

Thumb 

Using 3 DPN's, pick up 8 stitches on the first needle, 8 stitches on the second needle and 3 on the last needle.  Using the 3rd needle, pick up an extra 3 stitches where the inside of the thumb meets the mitt.  Ensure that these stitches are tight so that no gaps form at this point.

Knit 4 rows.
Establish a K1, P1 rib for a further 4 rows and loosely cast off.

Weave in any loose ends.

So there you have it .. a practical gift to make for any musician where warm hands are a must.

Happy knitting,
Louise

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