Monday, 8 April 2013

Icordion Cowl

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It's quite amazing what can be achieved on long, lazy afternoons when you are camping.  The first item that I packed this year was my knitting bag, so I had a lot of different yarn to play with.  However, the word lazy was integral here.  I wanted to knit, but did not want to push myself too hard - it was the holidays after all.

I thought I would knit up a quick cowl considering all the ones I make, I seem to give away as presents and I was pretty sure that by the time winter came, I would be the only one without one.  I have knitted a lot of accordion cowls recently so I knew how to knit them up without a pattern and made a start.  However,  partway into it, I had an idea.  I would 'decorate' the cowl with some icord.  The yarn I used (Araucania- Ruca) is beautiful.  Smooth to the touch, elegantly drapey but would not hold the accordion folds of the cowl so I thought I would help it along.

The same yarn is also used for our Bunker Bay Cowl.

Pattern

Using circular needles for the size appropriate for your yarn, cast on between 110 and 120 stitches.
Join stitches being careful not to twist your stitches and place a stitch marker to indicate the beginning of the row.

Knit 5 rows
Purl 5 rows
Repeat 3 times.

Row 31.  Knit 10, slip next 3 stitches onto a DPN and knit approximately 24 rows of icord.  Wrap the icord around your knitting (being careful not to twist the cord), slip the stitches back onto your main knitting and continue to knit the cowl for a further 25 stitches.  Bind off 3 stitches and continue knitting in the round.
Row 32.  Knit to beginning of the bind off stitches, place a stitch marker and cast on 3 stitches using the backward loop method.  Essentially, you make a loop in your yarn, and place it on the needle backwards. (See diagram to the left)  This creates a hole in your cowl, ready for the next icord strap.
The stitch marker is in place to ensure that your next icord exactly lines up with the newly created 'hole'.
Continue for 3 more knit rows, and then 5 Purl. 
Knit 5 rows
Purl 5 rows
Repeat twice.

Row 61.  Knit to stitch marker and, once again, slip stitches to DPN's and knit an icord.  This time when you thread the icord through, you will need to cut and reattach the yarn.  Slip the stitches back onto your main knitting and knit for a further 25 stitches.  Place a stitch marker and bind off 3 stitches and continue knitting.
Row 62.  As row 32.
Continue for 3 more knit rows and then 5 purl.
Knit 5 rows
Purl 5 rows
Repeat twice.

Row 91.  As row 61.
Row 92. Knit

Bind off.  I chose the Icord bind off which finishes the cowl beautifully.

At the first stitch of your bind off, cast on 3 stitches.
Knit 3, SSK (SSK - Insert the RH needle into the first stitch on the LH needls as if to knit.  Slip this stitch.  Repeat so you have 2 slipped stitches.  Insert the LH needle through the front loops of the slipped stitches and knit them together.  The SSK slants to the left and is essential in this bind off.)
Slip 4 stitches from the RH needle to the LH needle.  Knit 3, SSK.
You are decreasing 1 stitch everytime you complete a round of the icord.
Continue to the last  4 stitches.
K2tog twice.  Slip 2 stitches from the RH needle to LH needle
K2tog and secure last stitch.

To finish.  I slip stitched the Icord to the created hole.  I was concerned that, over time, the created hole may pull and stretch so I secured them with just a few stitches.  The icord stays in place and neatens the whole cowl.

Happy Knitting,
Louise

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Disclaimer: We are all part of one big crafting community so please do not sell our patterns or claim them as your own. You are free to do what you wish with finished items but if you sell them online, please link back to us for pattern credit. Please use your own images if advertising an item for sale from our patterns.  We are not expert pattern designers and believe knitting and crochet is a wonderful art form.  Therefore, many of the ways we create things may not be according to established methods.

11 comments:

  1. What a beautiful cowl Louise!

    Thanks for linking to a Round Tuit!
    Hope you have a fabulous week!
    Jill @ Creating my way to Success
    http://www.jembellish.blogspot.com/

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    Replies
    1. Thanks Jill. Looking forward to having a browse through all the wonderful links on a Round Tuit.

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  2. This is so lovely! Could you tell me how much yarn was needed? I'd like to make these for my granddaughters!

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    Replies
    1. Hello Martha .. This only took 2 x 50g balls of wool. The wool I used seemed to go a long way. Just to be safe though, I would budget on 3 balls. Louise

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  3. Found you on Round Tuit! I so want to learn how to do this!

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  4. This is so beautiful! I need to improve my knitting skills to make this. Thanks for sharing!

    Kristy O @ 3peppers-recipes.com

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    1. Thanks Kristy. The pattern is really very easy. I've just been browsing through your site and there are some great ideas and recipes - just had to subscribe :-)

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  5. Just gorgeous!Love the color and the yarn too.
    Thanks so much for sharing the great tutorial!
    Have a fabulous week!
    Hugs from Portugal,

    Ana Love Craft
    www.lovecraft2012.blogspot.com

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    Replies
    1. Thanks Ana and thanks for stopping by :-)

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  6. Lovely and so creative!! Thank you very much for the pattern, Louise :-))

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    Replies
    1. Thank you. I hope you enjoy the pattern. :-)

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