Wednesday, 27 February 2013

Chevron Crochet Hook Case

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Sometimes I find the way a project unfolds can be dictated by the materials used or the time available, but in this instance it was lack of materials that had me on the edge of my seat throughout.  I had decided that my ever growing collection of crochet hooks really need some more permanent accommodation than their original packaging and so sorted through my wool stash for suitable colours to make my hook case.  I had already decided on chevron and just happened to have a few part balls of yarn that I thought would be ideal, the only problem was that there really wasn't a huge amount left on any of the balls, and so from the outset I did wonder if there was going to be enough to finish, adding just a teensy bit of  fear anticipation to the whole endeavour.

I used 3 different colours in 8ply yarn and a size 4 crochet hook.

Chain 36
Row 1   Miss 2 chains and work 2 double crochets (DC) into the next chain.
*Work a DC into each of the next four chains
Miss 2 Chains and DC into the next chain.  DC into the next 3 chains.  Work 3 DC into the next chain.  Repeat from * across the row ending with 2 DC into last chain. Work 2 turning chains

Row 2 Change colour, Work 2 DC into the last double crochet of the previous row.
*Work a DC into the next 4 doubles of the previous row.
Miss 2 doubles of the previous row and then work a DC into each of the next 4 doubles of the previous row.
Work 3DC into the next double of the previous row.
Repeat from * ending the row with 2DC into the last stitch of the previous row.

Subsequent rows Change colour and work as per row 2.

Repeat until there are 7 rows in total.  End of Chevron.

Row 8
Using main colour, *Single Crochet (SC) into first 3 stitches of previous row, then in the subsequent stitches of the previous row, work 1 x Half Double (HDC), 1 x  DC, 2 x  Triple Crochet (TC), 1 x  DC, 1 x  HD and 3 x  SC.  Repeat from * to the end of the row.  This will produce a straight edge at the end of the chevron.

Rows 9 and 10
DC across entire row.

Row 11
This row forms the edge of the fold.
SC across the entire edge of previous row

Row 12 and 13
SC into the back loop only of each single crochet of the previous row.


Row 14-27
DC across entire row

Row 28 (at this point I was seriously worried about running out of wool, but in reality I think I would have preferred perhaps another 2-3 rows of DC, so feel free to add more rows prior to row 28)

This row forms the edge of the fold.  SC across entire edge of previous row

Row 29 and 30
SC into the front loop only of each SC of the previous row

Rows 31 and 32 (at this point I was really struggling as my ball of wool was now just down to a string of wool, so adding a couple more rows here would be fine if you have ample yarn and added a couple of extra rows from row 28)

DC into each stitch of previous row.

To finish

SC around the edge of the project, not including the Chevron edge.  Block for an even finish and SC on the inside of the case to form the hook holders.  It was my original intention to have a button closure on the front, however my lack of remaining yarn left me with no room to place one.  Instead I've used press studs which work really well to keep my beloved hooks enclosed.

Happy crocheting


Deb

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Disclaimer: We are all part of one big crafting community so please do not sell our patterns or claim them as your own. You are free to do what you wish with finished items but if you sell them online, please link back to us for pattern credit. Please use your own images if advertising an item for sale from our patterns.  We are not expert pattern designers and believe knitting and crochet is a wonderful art form.  Therefore, many of the ways we create things may not be according to established methods.



Monday, 25 February 2013

Twine Wrapped Easter Eggs

Pin It I seem to have become a bit impulsive of late.  Last week, when I was in the craft store, I picked up a packet of styrofoam eggs and before a few seconds had passed, knew what I was going to do with them, quickly purchased them and set off home.  Bit quick in hindsight, as I forgot to purchase what I had originally set out for.



The materials used for this project are:


Styrofoam eggs (any size)
Glue brush
PVA glue. 
Twine, Jute or string 
Buttons
Decorative cotton
These eggs are very easy and very quick to make.  It's a great craft to do with children and they will love decorating their egg with buttons, bits of felt, beads, sequins - anything you can get your hands on.  It is just a matter of wrapping the twine around an  egg that has been lightly coated in glue (although, PVA glue and I are not the best of friends and it can get a bit sticky).


To start, secure the end of the twine at the top of the egg using a pin.  Lightly coat the egg with PVA glue and gently start wrapping the twine around the base of the pin and continue outwards.

It's a bit like knitting a pair of socks - the first row is always the trickiest so hang in there.

Once the egg is wrapped, there are an unlimited number of ways that you can finish it off.


Pretty little Easter Eggs


A few years ago, a lady I used to work with gave me a few spools of Semco crochet cotton and I decided that this would be perfect for a bit of colour around the egg.

I was deliberately casual when I wrapped the colour as I wanted a 'homely' look.  The cotton is threaded through 3 buttons to give some dimension and the end of the thread is held in place with a little dab of PVA.

Egg-ceptional!




Twine Wrapped Easter Eggs
Happy Easter,

Louise

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Friday, 22 February 2013

Camping Fingerless Mittens

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Sunset on a Summer Evening
I have just returned from a camping trip to the beach and the bush.  All was going well at the beach.  The days were long and warm, the water was icy cold which was perfect for cooling down but things went a bit awry at the bush.  There was nowhere to visit as the park was miles from anywhere, the ants invaded with a ruthless ferocity and Peter, my partner, became quite ill and had to spend 2 days in bed.  




Wonderfully bright fingerless mittens.
Perfect for a winter holiday in the caravan.
During this time, I spent many hours knitting but I didn't have any patterns.  
I had relied on an internet connection to get patterns but I was a bit stuck in the middle of the bush.  Don't believe caravan park owners when they say the connection drops in and out.  It did not connect the whole time we were there.  

I had some sock wool to knit up a pair of socks, but I didn't really feel like making a pair.  (At this point, I thought that whatever Peter had  must be contagious - I have never not felt like knitting socks.  I am addicted to knitting them and have even come up with a booklet to help others).  Perhaps it was the ants or the heat but either way, could not commit myself to a pair.

So I played around with a pattern of sorts for some fingerless mittens instead. 


Pattern

Using your choice of sock wool, and 2.75 DPN's cast on 54 stitches onto 3 needles (18 per needle) and start knitting.  This is for a small size.  For medium cast on 62 stitches and for a large size, cast on 70 stitches.  I did not use a ribbing pattern, just launched straight into stockinette.

When your work measures the required distance, in this case 8cm, place 15 (17, 19) stitches onto one needle for the thumb.  Having never knitted mittens before, I could see straight away, that the inside of the thumb was a prime spot for 'stretched' stitches.  I threaded a completely different yarn onto a yarn needle and threaded this through the thumb stitches and pulled it quite firmly to close the opening.   This method worked beautifully for me.  There are only so many DPN's that you want to grapple with at any one time and threading the thumb stitches kept them secure without stretching them and also kept them out of the way.  

I then continued knitting the remaining 35 stitches for a further 8cm's.  In order to make the bind off a little looser, wrap the yarn over the needle and then knit the stitch.  This created just enough of a loose stitch to give the mitten/glove a bit of give without altering the look of the bind off.

Once this has been done, pick up the stitches that have been threaded for the thumb, and gently pull out the thread.  

It was too hot to put both mitts on.
I'm going to love these in winter!
Pick up 4 stitches along the inside of the thumb (a total of 19 (21, 23) stitches and distribute amongst 3 needles) .  When you pick up the extra 4 stitches, knit into the back of the stitch to create a firm stitch that will not stretch.  Knit for a further 4cm and, using the same cast off method, cast off.

Knit up another one and you are ready to go.  


Condensed pattern

Using DPN's Cast on 54 (62, 70) stitches and join in the round.
Knit for 8cm (9cm, 10cm)
Place 15 (17, 19) onto a separate needle or, using a separate yarn sew through the stitches and pull firmly.
Continue knitting for a further 8cm (9cm, 10cm)
Cast off loosely.
Pick up remaining 15 (17, 19) stitches making sure to 'pick up' an extra 4 stitches along the inside of the thumb.
Knit for a further 4cm (5cm, 6cm) and cast off loosely.

I admit, it does seem a bit incongruous to be knitting mittens in the middle of an Australian summer.  We also go camping in winter and I will get a lot of use out of them then.

(Peter is recovered now and we are planning a return to the beach in April)

Happy Knitting
Louise

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Wednesday, 20 February 2013

Egg Cosy Sampler

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Now that I've done a couple of embroidery projects (you can find them here), I figure I really should come to terms with some of the more basic stitches that I probably should have learnt first, but in my impatience skipped right over.  As Easter is fast approaching I thought a quick and easy cosy with basic stitches for decoration would be perfect practice.
Materials
Craft Store Felt
Embroidery Floss
Ribbon or Trim 
Needles
Scissors
Tailors Chalk
Sewing Machine (optional)



As my freehand drawing skills are not what I'd like them to be and to get an idea of size, I searched google images for an egg cosy template and found this gorgeous frog, and just used the body section for my outline. Although I have to say, if my boys were younger those frog cosies would have been very popular indeed! I traced two outlines, one for the back and the other for the front and got sewing. 

From top to bottom, the stitches I used are:
Scroll Stitch
Ermine Filling Stitch
Blanket Stitch (Two Rows)
Detached Chain - Flowers
Running Stitch - Whipped or laced

If you're looking for stitch guides, I've found that Sarah's Hand Embroidery Tutorials are wonderful.

I did both the front and back of the cosy, so that others sitting at the table aren't looking at a blank cosy from their position.

To finish I cut a small piece of trim and positioned it at the top of the cosy and then sewed the hem using my machine, but to be honest this could easily have been done by hand.



Mmmmmmm  boiled egg and soldiers!

I think I might try a "proper" sampler for my next project.  If I'm quiet for a while it's probably because I'm knee deep in sampler designs and can't decide which one to do.

Happy Stitching

Deb

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Monday, 18 February 2013

Wool Wrapped Letters

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It can be quite difficult to come up with ideas for party favours, particularly as children get a little older and you try to move beyond the sweet treat filled bag of goodies that permeates the party scene for younger kids.  A few months ago, Miss 11 came back from a crafty birthday party with an "Imagine" sign to decorate as she pleased, and I thought it was a fantastic idea for a gift to give to party attendees.  It's taken several months to decide how to decorate her sign, but Miss 11 finally decided that wool wrapping would provide a wonderful afternoon or two of raiding my wool stash and peacefully decorating to her heart's content.


Materials
Wooden sign or letter
PVA glue - or any other glue that dries clear
Assorted wool
Beads, buttons or butterflies to decorate










Method

Brush a small amount of glue onto the back of the first small section of the letter that you wish to wrap. 
Carefully wrap wool onto glued area and allow to dry.
Continue neatly wrapping  and glueing until the letter is completely covered. 
When changing wool, leave a small string of the old colour and set this on the next glued section while wrapping the new colour over and around. 
Once the last colour is complete leave a piece of yarn that is long enough to thread onto a needle and then slip the needle with the excess wool back under the wrapped wool, making sure that it is at the back of the letter out of view.
Glue beads, buttons or other embellishments as desired.



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Friday, 15 February 2013

Lego Brick Crochet Scarf

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I'm sure everyone has those moments when they say something and then instantly regret it.  My sons were not even discussing Lego or crochet when the words "I think I've seen crochet Lego bricks somewhere and you can use them to make blankets and scarves and things", tumbled from my mouth.  My sons eyes lit up, orders were immediately placed for items and I started to panic slightly that perhaps I was in over my head, given my crochet status of only ever so slightly above novice.

To help me along, I found this wonderfully informative video from The Crochet Crowd on how to do Bobble stitch and with a little bit of experimentation, Lego bricks were soon flowing off of my crochet hook.

The pattern that I thought produced the best brick was:

Using 8 ply and a size 4.5 crochet hook, chain 22

Row 1 
Double Crochet (DC) in 4th chain from hook and continue to DC the entire chain. Turn
Row 2
Chain 2.  Half Double (HD) crochet into base of Chain 2 (this counts as one stitch).  HD crochet two more times. Bobble five together. HD 3 times. Repeat bobble and 3 x HD a further 3 times to produce a line which contains 4 bobble stitches in total and finishes with 3 HD stitches. Turn
Row 3
Chain 3.  DC into second stitch in row and continue to DC along entire row. Turn.
Row 4
Repeat row 2
Row 5
Repeat row 3 to finish.



This makes a 4x2 Lego brick, which my sons tell me is "far cooler than any other size", but I think we'll all have to take their word for it!  If you are looking to make a 6x2 lego brick then a fabulous video from All Free Crochet is here


Make enough bricks for scarf to reach desired length (the teen I was making this scarf for is 6ft-ish, so many, many bricks were needed).  To finish off and join,  Single Crochet around the edge of each brick, take two bricks and with right sides facing inwards, Single Crochet together.  Once all blocks are joined, single crochet edge of entire scarf and block for an even finish.

At this point my orders are for a scarf and blanket - I can see I'll be dreaming Lego bricks for the next few weeks at least!

Happy brick building

Deb

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Disclaimer: We are all part of one big crafting community so please do not sell our patterns or claim them as your own. You are free to do what you wish with finished items but if you sell them online, please link back to us for pattern credit. Please use your own images if advertising an item for sale from our patterns.  We are not expert pattern designers and believe knitting and crochet is a wonderful art form.  Therefore, many of the ways we create things may not be according to established methods.

Wednesday, 13 February 2013

The Festival of Birthdays

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While most families spend January and February recovering from the highs and lows of the festive season, our household goes into birthday mode with two of my children and a niece all choosing to have their birthdays over a period of approximately two and a half weeks.

It all starts with my middle child who turned fifteen this year - where does the time go? He's not one for crafts and party food, in fact he celebrated with a bunch of friends sleeping over, piles of pizzas and a kilo of Jelly Bellies (our dentist is going to be delighted!) 

Then it's my niece's turn who celebrated her fourth birthday with an afternoon tea and despite telling my sister that I wouldn't go overboard this year, I couldn't resist the temptation to put together a few party platters.  The little teddy cars were an absolute hit and you can find the instructions here, we loved the cake pop skewers too- an easy peasy platter of cake pops cut in half with marshmallow and strawberry sandwiched in-between - and jelly orange segments to complete our dessert table.

To round out the birthday festival, my eldest turned 17.  I'm starting to wonder how I could possibly be the parent of a 17 year old - wasn't I just pushing him on a swing recently and getting him ready for his first day of school?  His birthday party was a mexican feast for friends and as he has a higher tolerance for craft than his brother I did a little embroidery as a gift tag for his present.

This was a simple case of choosing a font in word, resizing it so it was large, tracing it onto fabric and then outlining in back stitch.  Once this was complete I then used seed stitch around the entire name.  As a newbie embroiderer, I was a little frustrated that my letters weren't outlined as crisply as I would have liked, but that's OK as I'll get a bit more practice when the next birthday comes along in April!



Happy crafting


Deb


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Monday, 11 February 2013

Trellis Vine Cowl

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There are a number of 'Vintage' knit patterns available at the moment.  This usually means 40's or 50's but this isn't vintage enough for me.  I love the romance of proper old fashioned clothing and just adore Interweave publications of 'Jane Austen Knits'. Their quote on the front of the 2011 edition .. 


"It is a truth universally acknowledged that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of .. a warm vest"  

.. makes me laugh everytime.

I am always on the hunt for knitting patterns and came across 'Vine Tidy' from an 1884 Knitted lace sample book.  It forms part of an interesting blog by VINTAGEKATHLEEN on antique lace knitting. Now, I know that this is not Jane Austen era but it is getting into the 'vintage' that I am after.  I also loved the way that this pattern looks like a climbing vine one way, and interwoven hearts if you look at it upside down.

I only wanted to make something quite small with this pattern and decided on a cowl. 

I had some Debbie Bliss Prima in a dark, dusky pink which was the perfect colour to compliment the antique look I was after.


Pattern

To keep the antique feel, I decided on both a picot cast on and off and the cowl could be worn upside down or right way up .. you choose. 

Using a set of small, circular 3.75mm needles and the picot cast on method, cast on 133 stitches. (7 repeats of the highlighted 19 stitches from the chart)

Picot Cast On
Picot cast on.  Using the cable method of cast on, cast on 5 stitches.  Cast off 2 stitches. Transfer (slip)the remaining stitch on the RHS needle to the LHS needle and cast on 4 more stitches to make a total of 5.  Cast off 2, transfer and repeat until you have required amount of stitches.

Cable Cast on.  When you insert the needle to cast on a stitch, instead of inserting it through the stitch, insert it before the stitch ie. between 2 stitches.

1st row: Join, being careful not to twist your stitches and Knit
2nd row: Follow chart until your cowl is the desired length.  The pattern is designated by what is in the outlined box.  I completed 7 repeats for a cowl that is 30cm long before it is blocked.

Each even numbered row of the pattern is a knit row




Tip:  On the knit row, I knit into the back of the PSSO stitch and give it a very gentle tug.  It seems to stop a bit of the twisting and gives a neater effect.

Once you have the length you are after, cast off, once again, using the picot method.

Picot Bind off:  Cast on 2 stitches using the cable cast on and then bind off 4.  Transfer (slip) the stitch that remains on the RHS needle to the LHS needle. Cast on 2 more, cast off 4 more, transfer and repeat.
Picot Bind/Cast off.

"You must allow me to say how ardently I admire and love .. this cowl"




Happy Knitting,
Louise

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Disclaimer: We are all part of one big crafting community so please do not sell our patterns or claim them as your own. You are free to do what you wish with finished items but if you sell them online, please link back to us for pattern credit. Please use your own images if advertising an item for sale from our patterns.  We are not expert pattern designers and believe knitting and crochet is a wonderful art form.  Therefore, many of the ways we create things may not be according to established methods.

Friday, 8 February 2013

Valentine Wine Cosy

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It just wouldn't be FitzBirch Crafts without a wine cosy to mark a special occasion and what better time for a glass of wine than the early evening of Valentines night?

This cosy is one of our designs that has had a slight tweak to help cupid on the night.


Pattern Instructions:-


Using DPN's size 4 and M (Creme) cast on 48 stitches.
Establish a K2, P2 rib and continue for 7cm.

In you final row of ribbing, increase between each set of K2's.  This will increase your stitches to 60.  It is important for the gingham pattern that the stitches be in multiple of 3's.

Continue in stocking stitch using M for 2 cm.

Gingham Pattern:
Using M K3, Using C1 (light Pink) K3.  Continue to end.
Repeat this row 2 more times (3 rows in total)

Next row - Using C1, K3, Using C2 (dark Pink) K3.  Continue to end.
Repeat this row 2 more time (3 rows in total)

Next row -
Using M K3, Using C1 (light Pink) K3.  Continue to end.
Repeat this row 2 more times (3 rows in total)

Continue in M and stocking stitch until you are approximately 6cm from the bottom of the bottle.

Repeat the Gingham pattern once more.

Continue in M and stocking stitch until you are approximately 1 cm from the bottom of the bottle.

Decrease 1 stitch at each end of each needle for every row until 4 stitches remain on each needle.

Cut wool leaving a 10cm tail and using a wool needle, thread back through the stitches and pull firmly.  Secure tail.

Button Heart

I purchased a cheap heart decoration from a very large Swedish retailer which I covered in an assortment of buttons.  If you can't located one, then a sturdy cardboard heart covered in paper or fabric and then covered in buttons will do.   Then just glue the buttons in place.  It can be a bit fiddly and I have a blister to prove it, but it's worth it.  It's very cute.

It is then a case of hanging it around the neck of the bottle and enjoying quality time together.

Happy Knitting and Happy Valentine,
Louise

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Other Wine Cosy Patterns from FitzBirch Craft

Christmas Wine Cosies
Floral Wine Cosy
Halloween Wine Cosy - Creepy Cabernet
Halloween Wine Cosy - Tarantula
Halloween Wine Cosy


Disclaimer: We are all part of one big crafting community so please do not sell our patterns or claim them as your own. You are free to do what you wish with finished items but if you sell them online, please link back to us for pattern credit. Please use your own images if advertising an item for sale from our patterns.  We are not expert pattern designers and believe knitting and crochet is a wonderful art form.  Therefore, many of the ways we create things may not be according to established methods.

Wednesday, 6 February 2013

Misty Morning Cowl (and Matching Hat)

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Easy Eyelet Cowl
My parents always get up at some Godforsaken hour to go for their daily walk.  
This does not change whether it is Summer or Winter and my Mum has often mentioned that she would like a warm hat and scarf to go walking in - for the cooler mornings of course.

Well, recently, it was her birthday and I knitted her a matching set.  The only problem is, it's the middle of summer.  We are expecting 40C in 2 days so I am afraid, she may have to wait a few months until she can wear them.

Both the patterns are super easy (and quick .. ).  I chose to knit the set in 8ply 'Denim' by Bendigo Woollen Mills.  The wool already has a 'lived-in' look.  Perfect for casual, everyday wear. This set is meant to be something that you throw on every morning and I wanted a very durable wool.

Mothers' day isn't far away so I shall save the gorgeous lacey knits until then.

Cowl Pattern

Using 4.5mm circulars, cast on 120 stitches.

Knit 10 rows in plain.
11th row:  Purl
12th row: YO, K2tog to the end of the row.

These 12 rows form the pattern.  Knit another 6 repeats.

After the final 12th row, knit the next row and then bind off.  This leaves an eyelet  edging at the top which looks very sweet.  

Hat Pattern

Cast on 90 stitches.
Knit 10 rows plain.
11th row: Purl
12th row: YO, K2tog to end.

Repeat these 12 rows twice more before you start the decreasing.

Decreasing..
1st decreasing row:  Knit 8, K2Tog. Rpt to end of row
2nd: Knit
3rd: Knit 7, K2tog. Rpt to end of row
4th: Knit
5th: Knit 6, K2tog. Rpt to end of row
6th: Knit
7th: Knit 5, K2tog. Rpt to end of row
8th: Knit
9th: Knit 4, K2tog. Rpt to end of row
10th: Knit
11th: Knit 3, K2tog. Rpt to end of row
12th: Knit
13th: Knit 2, K2tog. Rpt to end of row
14th: Knit
15th: Knit 1, K2tog. Rpt to end of row
16th: Knit
17th: K2tog to end of row

Leaving a tail of yarn and using a yarn needle, thread the last remaining stitches and pull firmly and secure.  Weave in any threads and you are ready to go walking in those cold, misty mornings.




Misty Morning Cowl and Hat look good at any age .. 


More cowls and scarves from Fitzbirch


Happy Birthday Mum - Hope this keeps you warm in the cool mornings.

Happy Knitting,
Louise

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Monday, 4 February 2013

Valentine's Homestead Wreath

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Valentine's Day in Australia falls in one of the hottest month's of the year.  It's not unusual for the temperature to hover at around forty degrees celcius and fresh flowers and chocolates tend to wilt and melt as they try and withstand the late Summer onslaught.  When I first thought of making a Valentine's wreath for our front porch, my mind immediately thought of collecting dried twigs and weaving them into shape, but then the comforting whir of the airconditioner reminded me that it was far too hot outside and so I went to my shelves of craft supplies to see if there was anything that would do the trick.


Materials

Florist wire
Beads
Ribbon

Method

Using lengths of florists wire, bend into heart shape and wrap ends around each other to secure in place.  I used approxiamtely 15-20 lengths for each side of the heart.
Once secure take two more lengths of wire, one for each side of the heart and wrap these around the heart shape adding beads as you go.
Take a long length of ribbon and wrap around wires, starting at the bottom and leaving enough length at the top to create a bow and/or loop for hanging.  I cut my ribbon in half, allowing it to fray, as I wanted to give my wreath a well-worn feel as it welcomed visitors to the house.




Happy Crafting

Deb

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Friday, 1 February 2013

Embroidery Rose Heart

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I'm sure there is an order in which one should learn embroidery stitches, perhaps starting with a basic running stitch and building up a repertoire?  The only problem is that my embroidery book  (The A-Z of Embroidery Stitches by Country Bumpkin Publications) provides stitch instructions in alphabetical order and offers no insight into the learning process, which left me at a bit of a loss as far as what to do for my first few projects (as you can see I'm frightfully ambitious - no "I'll just attempt a few lines of each stitch first" for me!)

It just so happens that I glanced upon the instructions for "Cast-on Stitch Roses" (there's a great tutorial with pictures here) and thought as a knitter, casting on is something that comes quite naturally and that for a beginner project, doing something within my comfort zone was probably a great idea.

To start I used a heart template downloaded from the web and traced it onto my fabric using tailors chalk. My thread colours  are:

Anchor 869 Amethyst(DMC 168 Silver Gray)
Anchor 870 Amethyst (DMC 3042 Antique Violet)

Anchor 871 Amethyst (DMC 3041 Antique Violet)

Anchor 213 Juniper (DMC 3024 Brown Gray)
Anchor 214 Juniper (DMC 966 Baby Green )

I started with the largest rose with the centre in the darkest shade, progressing to lighter shades with each layer of petals.  I loved the cast on stitch and as I had envisaged, my years of knitting really did come in handy!  My centre petal had a cast-on of 12, stitches, the 5 petals of the next layer had  cast-ons of 16, while the outer petals had cast-ons of 19.



The outline of the heart is embroidered using "Scroll Stitch" in the darkest shade of green. I found a really wonderful and easy to follow tutorial here.  While I used a three layered rose for the top centre of the heart, I varied the colour combinations and sizes as I worked my way around the piece.



One of my favourite aspects of "Cast-on Stitch" is its almost 3D effect. It's really raised from the fabric and makes the work look very substantial, even though in essence this was a quick project that I finished in just a few hours (I'm sure hoping I'll get quicker as time goes on.)






I was really quite pleased with how this turned out.  I'd like to get the cast-ons a bit neater next time and spend a little more time planning the placement of the roses, but I'm looking forward to using this stitch again...so I think we can take that as a good sign that embroidery and I are becoming firm friends!

Happy stitching

Deb




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