Wednesday, 27 March 2013

Happy Easter

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Easter spells out beauty, the rare beauty of new life.  ~S.D. Gordon

It's hard to believe Easter is almost upon us.  Wasn't Christmas only last month??  We've been busily decorating our homes with eggs of all descriptions and thought it would be wonderful to put it all together to show you what we've been up to this year.

Twine Wrapped Easter Eggs
 

Louise made some lovely twine wrapped eggs, finished with crochet cotton in Spring hues and a myriad of buttons to accentuate the natural feel of the decoration.  I can just imagine these in a wooden bowl as a table centrepiece.  



                    No Bake Easter Cookies
  


I came up with a plan to decorate cookies (or biscuits as we call them in Australia).  These took no time at all and I was thrilled with how they turned out.   Sometimes when I'm decorating cakes and biscuits, what I envisaged in my head doesn't always come to fruition, but thankfully in this case it did, and they were delicious too. 

                                              Gnome on the Range Egg Cosy

Our little gnome is a very sweet addition to any breakfast table and Louise shared her pattern for any knitters who's breakfast table is calling out  for this little fellow.  You can find the complete pattern here

                                                          Egg Cosy Sampler 
  

Another egg cosy we came up with was as an embroidery sampler.  A great way to learn different stitches on a small scale, while producing a lovely cosy to keep your egg warm.  This one might even be a great project for young beginners. 


Daisy Egg Cosy
 

Another egg cosy (and a fantastic way to use up small amounts of wool) is our Knitted Daisy Cosy.   It's like waking up to a table full of spring sunshine, very helpful at this time of the year in Australia when the days are starting to shorten and there's a definite chill in the morning air.

Fabric Covered Eggs

Lastly, inspired by some fabric in the remnants bin that had a beautiful stained glass feel, we put together a bowl of fabric covered eggs, to decorate either the mantle or table.

Happy Easter

Deb and Louise


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Monday, 25 March 2013

Fabric covered eggs

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I was rummaging through the remnants basket at my local craft shop during the week, when a small piece of fabric caught my eye and in an instant I knew exactly what I would use it for. Sometimes it's lovely to not actually be looking for anything in particular, but find the perfect inspirational piece out of the blue. The fabric was a busy piece of polyester in hues of blue, greens and yellows in a design which reminded me of a stained glass window...perfect for a little Easter decorating and at $1, a  bargain too good to pass up.



Materials

Fabric
PVA glue and paint brush
scissors
Foam eggs
pins
ribbon
sequins (optional)


Method

Cut a piece of fabric that is wide enough to wrap around the egg and overlap a little at the edges and long enough to reach the top and bottom of the egg, plus a little overlap on each end.

Cut half centimetre strips approximately one third of the width.  Do this on both sides, leaving a one third section of fabric in the centre untouced,  and then cut the end of each half centimtre strip into a triangle shape.

Cover the fabric in glue and wrap around the egg, neatly overlapping the ends to follow the curve of the egg.

To finish, pin or glue ribbon aound the eggs.  I used a sequin at the top for a little sparkle.


These were a little messy and time consuming, but I really enjoyed making them and think they're perfect for our Easter table decoration.  

Happy crafting

Deb

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Friday, 22 March 2013

Interlocking Cables.

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Every now and again I feel the need for a really 'meaty' knitting project.  I didn't have enough wool in my stash for a large project which meant I had to cast about for a project and then the wool (or the wool and then the project).  Always a delightful process.  I never have to be asked twice to browse through internet sites for patterns and online wool shops for inspiration.

In this case, the project came first.

I discovered the pattern in a 'Knitting Daily Free E-Book' and decided that you couldn't get any meatier - this was the project! Shirley Paden patterns are always beautiful.

I ordered the wool from Bendigo Woollen Mills in Rich Alpaca 'Pecan'.

Alpaca - the minute it arrived I knew that this was going to be a seriously warm jumper.

This pattern is for experienced knitters.  Every aspect of it is cabled and it's such a shame that I knitted this BEFORE I taught myself to cable without a cable needle. (Knitty have a wonderful tutorial on this if you have always wanted to learn).


Surprisingly, it knitted up quite quickly.  That's always a bonus with me as I tend to 'drift' onto other projects if something takes too long.  Yes, I know it's not ideal but I have never subscribed to the theory that every project must be finished before you can move onto another.

In the end, it was quite straightforward as jumpers go and joining it up posed no problems at all.

Once I had completed this jumper, I  sewed in some thin elastic around the neck/shoulder line to keep it in place.  

As I initially thought, this keeps me very, very warm even though my shoulders are bare.  I can only wear it in the middle of winter which means here in Perth, that's about a week in August.  Seriously though, I really like the fact that it is very dressy so I can wear it out to dinner with a pair of slim black pants and high boots but it works just as well with jeans.  


Cables, cables ... everywhere.
** Note to any US knitters - In Australia, we refer to sweaters as jumpers.  

Happy Knitting,
Louise

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Wednesday, 20 March 2013

Daisy Egg Cosy

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Sunny Side Up Daisy Egg Cosy
This egg cosy is a delightful little pick-me-up first thing in the morning.  You can't help but smile at the thought of a little flower on your egg.

The pattern is very straightforward and can easily be knitted in one evening.


Pattern

Materials needed - Any kind of white yarn that you have in your stash.  About a quarter of a ball.  
Needles to match the ply.  
Yellow buttons

Cast on 8 stitches

Row 1:    Slip 1, Knit to end
Row 2:    Slip 1, Purl to end
Row 3:    Slip 1, K1, (YO, K1) to end

Repeat rows 1 and 2 until work measures about 6 or 7 cm.

1st Cast off row:      Slip 1, K2tog, K to last 3 stitches, K2tog, K1
2nd Cast off row:    Slip 1, P2tog, P to last 3 stitches, P2tog, P1

Repeat these 2 rows until 3 stitches remain and then hold the petal on a stitch holder.

Make 5 more petals.

With the tail of the last petal, thread a yarn needle and thread through all the stitches being held on the stitch holder.  Pull firmly, secure and weave in the end of the yarn.  Weave in all other ends.

I 'half blocked' the cosy by stretching out the top of the petal and pinning it in place.  This is to ensure that the top of the cosy completely covers the egg and heat is not lost through loose petals.

Sew on yellow buttons and you are ready for your boiled eggs and toast.

Happy Knitting,

Louise


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Monday, 18 March 2013

No Sew Braid Headband

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The Grade 6 market week at our local primary school is a much anticipated fundraising event where the graduating class provide stalls for younger students to purchase anything from cups of cordial through to origami and having fancy nail polish applied.  Much thought goes into the day and this year my daughter's group have devised a "DIY stall" where fellow students get to participate in a craft activity and then take home their finished item.  So far, among other things, they have devised colouring-in sheets for the very young students, bead bracelets and no-sew headbands.

These are very quick and simple and my daughter made it in white as a trial run (for no other reason than the fact that it was the fabric at the top of my fabric stash), I think on the day some fleece and shiny polyesters might be included.



Materials
Fabric - 90cm x 6cm (approx 35inch x 2.5inch)
Scissors


Method
-Leaving one end of the fabric uncut and still joined, place fabric on a flat surface and in 2cm widths, cut three lengths into the fabric of approximately 85cm, ie. leaving a section of 5cm at one end uncut.

-Braid/plait the fabric length as shown until approximately 5cm remains

-Place headband around head and tie the band loosely in a knot. Cut off excess fabric





It's a pity parents don't get to attend - I think I might have liked to have made one of these for me!

Happy crafting

Deb

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Friday, 15 March 2013

Mini Cable Wrap

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I saw this Free Pattern from Lily Chin for a 5 - Way Cable wrap and desperately wanted to make it - but I didn't have enough wool, no where near enough!

I had a few balls (4) of an 8ply denim coloured cotton.  I decided that instead of making a thick, winter wrap, I would make a spring/summer wrap.  Just enough coverage to keep the chill off. It could still be worn in a number of different ways depending on where you positioned the toggle button.  In this case, it became a 4-way cable wrap.

I started knitting with the disappointment you get of having to knit whilst not being sure how far you are going to reach.  I kept watching my wool and when I judged that I had enough to finish by completing a crocheted slip stitch all the way round, I stopped.  This ended up being 90cm as I made sure that I finished at the end of a cable section.

To finish, I started at the top corner, slip stitched all the way round and when I came back to my start point, I chained 12 to form a loop for the toggle button and finished.  From here, it's just a matter of sewing on the button and it's ready to go.

I was very happy though, it's just the right length for a summer cape and looks great with a pair of slim fitting jeans.

I am seriously tempted to purchase enough wool to make the winter version.  It's quite a delightful pattern.

More Cowls & wraps from FitzBirch


Happy knitting,

Louise


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Wednesday, 13 March 2013

No Bake Easter Cookies

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This is definitely not a cooking blog, but I figure that as there is no actual cooking involved in making these lovely Easter edibles, I can get away with blogging about them on a craft blog...hopefully!  In Australia, cookies are called "biscuits" and the variety that I've used here are "Milk Arrowroot", a classic plain biscuit that has been a staple on Australian supermarket shelves for a very long time indeedy.  If you can't get "Milk Arrowroot" biscuits, any plain oval biscuit/cookie will do.

 You will need

1 packet of Milk Arrowroot biscuits
1 ready pack of white icing
Food colouring
Ready made icing flowers
Oval Cookie Cutter
Icing Texture Sheets
Rolling Pin
A little icing sugar  with water to form a thin, runny icing mix.


Method

To start, knead the ready pack icing until it is soft and pliable.  Add a few drops of food colouring until the icing has reached the desired shade or leave as white if you prefer.

Roll out to an even thickness, place texture mat on top of icing, firmly roll with rolling pin once only and carefully remove mat.  I purchased my texture mats from a cake supplier on ebay and I really love using them as it's an easy, but impressive way to add a touch of elegance to cakes (or biscuits in this case).

Using oval cookie cutter, cut out required number of shapes and place onto biscuits using a thin mixture of icing sugar and water to attach.

To decorate:  Cut thin strips from the remaining ready made icing (use the reverse side if you don't want any texture in the icing ribbon) and using the oval cookie cutter, cut icing ribbon strips to the correct width.  Attach both icing ribbon and ready made flower using the thin icing mixture.


I just love how these turned out.  They were so quick and simple to make and could even be a great little project for kids to help with - if you're not adverse to a few finger prints on the icing!

Happy Easter

Deb

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Monday, 11 March 2013

Off to Canada Scarf

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Fisherman's Rib Scarf - with a bit of detail.
A little while ago, my children enjoyed a fabulous holiday in Canada - in winter!  I have lived through a winter in Canada and loved every minute - every freezing cold, toe numbing minute.

I could not, in all honesty, call myself a knitter if I did not use this excuse to knit up a frenzy.  There were scarves to be knitted, socks to be crafted, hats and ear warmers that needed serious consideration.  My children didn't believe that they would need ear warmers.  (Oh the folly of youth!)  and I could not persuade them otherwise so - no ear warmers for them.

Hayley said that she just wanted a plain scarf to keep her warm.  I had visions of my Australian born children freezing miserably in the Canadian winter (Yes, I know that there are a billion warm items readily available to them over there - but they were not handmade by their mum) so I decided on one of the warmest knitting stitches I have ever come across - Fisherman's Rib.

The Fisherman's rib pattern is very easy and I figured if it can keep the fisherman warm in the arctic seas, it can keep my daughter warm as she does her shopping.

Fisherman's Rib Pattern

Row 1: K1, *p1, k1; rep from * to end.
Row 2: P1, *k1b, p1* rep from * to end.
Row 3: K1, *p1, k1b; rep from * to last two sts, p1, k1.
Repeat rows 2 & 3 until you have reached your desired length.
K1b - Insert your working needle into the stitch directly below the first stitch on your main needle, knit wise.  Knit the stitch as you normally would.  Pull the worked stitch and the stitch above it off the needle together.

Scarf Pattern

Simple details to transform a very simple scarf.
Materials required:
100g 8 ply wool (Main Colour - MC)
remnants of 8ply (Colour 1 - C1)

Using MC, cast on 42 stitches and knit in Fisherman's Rib pattern until work measures 12cm

Using C1, P one row, (This becomes the right side of the work as we want the garter stitch detail to show) K one row.  

Using MC, knit 4cm in Fisherman's Rib.

Repeat garter stitch rows in C1.

Using MC, knit 4cm in Fisherman's Rib.

Repeat garter stitch rows in C1.

Continue in MC Fisherman's Rib until you are 20cm from your desired length.

Repeat garter stitch rows in C1.

Using MC, knit 4cm in Fisherman's Rib.

Repeat garter stitch rows in C1.

Using MC, knit 4cm in Fisherman's Rib.

Repeat garter stitch rows in C1.

Using MC, knit 12cm in Fisherman's Rib and bind off.

Fringing detail.

Using a crochet hook and C1, do a single crochet in each bind off stitch.

Now it's time for the crochet bobbles.  Follow the instructions for the 3dc bobble here.

Once you have finished the bobble, crochet 1 treble, ch 3,  1 treble evenly across the finished bobble row.

To finish, cut 4 lengths of 20cm (C1) for each tassel and knot them into every second loop hole.

The scarf ended up being VERY warm (and I secretly made it wide enough to cover any ears that may inadvertently be exposed to the cold)

More Scarves and Cowls by FitzBirch

How to knit for a Perfectionist - (this is the scarf I knitted for my son to take to Canada)

Keep warm and Happy Knitting,

Louise.

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Disclaimer: We are all part of one big crafting community so please do not sell our patterns or claim them as your own. You are free to do what you wish with finished items but if you sell them online, please link back to us for pattern credit. Please use your own images if advertising an item for sale from our patterns.  We are not expert pattern designers and believe knitting and crochet is a wonderful art form.  Therefore, many of the ways we create things may not be according to established methods.


Friday, 8 March 2013

Quick Loom Knit Scarf

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Sometimes it can be difficult to name a project.  When I sat down to make this scarf I was hovering between "Bargain Hunter Scarf" or "Quick Loom Scarf", but in the end the fact this was done in only a few hours made me lean more towards "Quick" rather than my other option.  The first  rejected title came about due to a wonderful shopping trip to Spotlight where I picked up the wool in the specials bin.  I can't tell you how thrilled I was to purchase a whole bag of "Bella Baby" wool (I've used 4 ply "Sparkle" in 60% acrylic and 40% wool for this project) on sale at $2.00 a ball and then  a discount voucher added to the mix making them half that price.  I was in craft heaven!  



My intention was to make a scarf that wasn't necessarily for warmth, but more a little something to add style to a mid-season wardrobe.

The pattern is very simple and this is a great beginner project:

Cast on 
Use e-wrap stitch (there's a great e-wrap video tutorial here), but rather than e-wrap every peg, e-wrap four pegs, run wool across the back of the next peg, e-wrap three, run wool across the back of the next peg, e-wrap three, run wool across the back of the next peg then e-wrap four.  This uses 17 pegs along one side of the 38 peg loom.

Pattern
As per cast on, e-wrap four, run wool across the back of the peg, e-wrap three, run wool across the back of the next peg, e-wrap three, run wool across the back of the next peg, e-wrap four.  Continue until scarf is desired length.  Cast off.

Tassels

For the tassel ends of the scarf, I cut five equal lengths of wool, folded them in half and formed a loop before threading them through the edge of the scarf (a couple of stitches from the base for extra strength), I then pulled the ends of the wool pieces through the loop and pulled gently to form the tassels.  Complete for both edges.  This project used just under one and a half 50g balls of wool.





My daughter loves how this loose knit scarf turned out and quickly squirreled it away to her room- I haven't had the heart to tell her I was actually making it for me!

Happy looming

Deb

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Other FitzBirch loom knit projects:
Knifty Loom Knit Leg Warmers
Loom Knit Gauntlets
Loom Knit Market Bag
Loom Knit Remote Control Holder
Loom Knit Socks
Charity Knitting


Disclaimer: We are all part of one big crafting community so please do not sell our patterns or claim them as your own. You are free to do what you wish with finished items but if you sell them online, please link back to us for pattern credit. Please use your own images if advertising an item for sale from our patterns.  We are not expert pattern designers and believe knitting and crochet is a wonderful art form.  Therefore, many of the ways we create things may not be according to established methods.


Wednesday, 6 March 2013

Upcycled Denim Bag

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I love nothing better than to declutter and going through my wardrobe to rid myself of old clothes is no exception.  All the better stuff gradually makes its way to the local charity collection bin, but I've had a hankering for a while to use the perfectly good denim from old jeans for new projects.
My new bag is the lower legs and waistband of a comfortable pair of jeans that were  past their use-by date.  Fraying edges and not  the right cut to be on trend, this was a pair that I knew I wouldn't miss and if disaster did strike and my project didn't go to plan, it wouldn't be the end of my world.                  

To start I cut the lower legs off the jeans approximately the length I wanted the bag to be, plus a little extra to allow for hems.  To make the tubes of denim flat, I cut down the inside seam of the leg, leaving the more detailed outer seam intact so it could be a feature of the bag.  I also cut the waistband off, staying very close to the outer edge of the band to keep it intact, but also not to get extra fabric from the body of the jeans to give a neat-ish edge.


For the lining, I chose a feminine cotton, a lovely contrast to the heavy duty feel and look of the denim. I marked and cut the lining around the existing denim leg pieces, allowing an extra couple of centremetres (approx 1 inch) of the lining fabric at the top edge of the denim so it could be turned over and sewn to make a neat top inner edge to the bag.  As I wasn't hugely concerned about getting a neat edge to the inside seams, I simple folded over the top seam and with wrong sides facing, pinned and sewed the lining to the denim (making sure I was using a "denim" sewing needle in my machine).  Then with right sides of the denim together sew around three sides of the bag leaving the top seam open.


To attach the strap, which was formally the waistband of the jeans, I used "Jean Buttons" (if it was a name it could have come straight from the servants quarters of Downton Abbey) which you can purchase from your local craft store and come complete with instructions, although minus the hammer needed to bang them into place.  I decided to use the existing button hole on the strap for placement on one side and to attach the other side, I used my sewing machine and sewed in place as this edge still had the button from the waistband and I didn't want to cut it off and make extra work.








I'm really quite thrilled with the transformation of my old jeans.  I love the lining and I'm undecided about adding extra embellishment to the outside of the bag, perhaps a floral flower made out of the same fabric as the lining, or even one of the pockets from the original jeans...or maybe even some fabric roses made from denim, after all, I've still got half a pair of jeans left to use up!

Happy Sewing

Deb


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Monday, 4 March 2013

Gnome on the Range Egg Cosy

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Gnome .. or Mr Nice Guy
Who doesn't mind a bit of whimsy first thing in the morning?  This little egg cosy will have you smiling as you tuck into your breakfast.


Pattern

Using a set of DPN's to suit your choice of wool (I used Paton's Caressa for no other reason than it was in my stash) cast on 42 stitches - 14 on each of 3 needles.  Join, being careful not to twist your stitches and place a stitch marker to indicate the beginning of the row.

Knit until work measures 3cm.
Next row.  Knit 6, K2tog to end of row.
Knit 4 rows
Then, Knit 5, K2tog to end of row
Knit 4 rows
Then, Knit 4, k2tog to end of row
knit 4 rows
Then Knit 3, K2tog to end of row
Knit 4 rows
Then Knit 2, K2tog to end of row
Knit 4 rows
Then Knit 1, K2tog to end of row
Knit 4 rows
K2tog to end of row and then, using a yarn needles, thread the tail of your knitting through the stitches and pull firmly.

Beard

The beard was an interesting experiment.  I didn't have any 'fluffy' wool that seemed suitable for a beard so I used cushion filler.  

Cast on 21 stitches whilst at the same time holding a small amount of filler.  I gently eased out the filler so it wasn't too bulky and made sure that as I was knitting, that the filler was being incorporated into the stitches.  A bit of mixed media if you will.

Row 1:  Knit
Row 2:  K2tog, knit to final 2 stitches, K2tog

Repeat rows 1 & 2 until 3 stitches remain.
Slip 2 stitches purlwise, K1, PSSO.

Attach the beard to the underside of the little hat ensuring that the beard has about 1cm of attachment at each side leaving a little gap for the glasses.  The glasses give this little man a shot of personality - hard to find first thing in the morning!

Weave in any ends and you are ready to put the kettle on and boil some eggs.  


More Easter Crafts


Happy Knitting,
Louise

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Disclaimer: We are all part of one big crafting community so please do not sell our patterns or claim them as your own. You are free to do what you wish with finished items but if you sell them online, please link back to us for pattern credit. Please use your own images if advertising an item for sale from our patterns.  We are not expert pattern designers and believe knitting and crochet is a wonderful art form.  Therefore, many of the ways we create things may not be according to established methods.

Friday, 1 March 2013

Summer Rose Capelet

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I have a love of crocheted roses (our previous posts about Knitted Door Stops and a Button Rose Tea Cosy are testimony to that) so I thought I would give knitted roses a try.  

My parents recently skipped across the country to visit my sister Deb and deliver her long awaited, hand made knitting loom (you can read about it here), and they brought me back some beautiful 8ply bamboo/wool blend.

The minute I saw this gorgeous bamboo, I knew what I would make.  A summer capelet that sits comfortably on your shoulders that stops the chill in the evenings.

Not that we have had much chill.  We have been experiencing a heat wave that has seen the coolest temperature in the last week reach 37C.   Thank goodness for air conditioning.  Not only does it help keep everyone sane, but it allows me to knit when the outside temperature is making cinders of my garden.

I scouted about for a pattern but couldn't really find anything until I came across a pattern from China (I think) for a beautiful scalloped cast on.  There were no instructions .. I had to follow some pictures.  So I thought I would translate them here.  It looks a bit fiddly, and to be honest, it is to start with but once you get the hang of it, it's quite delightful.


Instructions for Scallop Cast On

One.   You will need your yarn, the appropriate knitting needles AND a crochet hook.

Two.  Holding both the knitting needle and the crochet hook together, cast on 10 stitches over both of them.

Three.  Wrap the yarn around the crochet hook.

Four.  Pull the hook loosely through the 10 stitches.  Don't pull too tightly at this point.

Five.  Using the end of the hook, place it through (pick up) the first of the 10 stitches.  The scallop will now be on the crochet hook, held in position by the first and last stitch.

Six.  Using your knitting needle, pick up the two stitches on the hook and transfer them to the needle.

Seven.  Using the first stitch on the needle as an anchor, cast on 10 stitches and continue the 'scallop' process.

Eight.  Continue the process until you have the desired amount of cast on stitches or scallops.


IMPORTANT NOTE:  Even though each scallop has only 2 stitches at the moment, it becomes 4 after the first round of knitting.  The first row is K1, make 2 using the backwards loop cast on, K1.  Repeat to end of row.
So, for example, this capelet requires 144 stitches so you need to do a quarter of 144 (36 scallops).   Each scallop becomes 4 stitches.  This pattern is a small size.  I would do 42 scallops for a medium and 50 scallops for a large.

This capelet calls for 5 x 50g balls of bamboo for a small size.  Allow an extra ball for the larger sizes. This capelet is knitted in the round and requires a set of circular needles.


Capelet Instructions

Once you have completed your cast on and have 36 scallops (it's definitely easier to count scallops than stitches),  join your yarn being careful not to twist your stitches and begin row one.

As I have already mentioned, row one is an increase row.

Knit 1, (this stitch is the original stitch), *K first stitch of first scallop, make 2 stitches using the backwards loop cast on., K1*  Repeat from * to end of the row.  You should now have the required number of stitches and are ready to knit your capelet.

Knit 18 rows of plain stockinette stitch.
Purl 18 rows

Repeat the previous 36 rows a further 2 times and then loosely cast off.  If your cast off is too tight, it will be to too snug around your shoulders and you may not be able to move your arms freely.


Knitted Rose.

These roses are just lovely.  Nice and full and very, very easy to make.

  • Firstly, cast on approximately 165 stitches.   I have used a circular needle as I use them all the time, even for non-circular patterns so standard needles are just fine.
  • Without joining up , knit 12 rows in plain stockinette stitch finishing on a purl row.  The reason for this is that you want the cast on tail on one side of the knitting and the cast off tail on the other.
  • Once you have the desired width of rose, thread a wool needle with the tail of your wool and thread it back through your stitches to cast off.
  • Pull firmly and you will end up with a twisty, twirly piece of knitting.
  • Starting at the end of the twist with the cast on tail, slowly ease it around and around and you end up with a lovely knitted rose.  
  • Once you have the desired shape, thread the tail from the cast on through the centre and gently pull.  This makes the edge of your knitting sink into the rose and then you can't see the edge.  Tie this end to the cast off tail and the rose is finished. 
  • Attach to your capelet and you are ready to go partying for the evening.




I must admit to being very happy with this capelet and I can't wait to wear it.  The bamboo has just enough stretch in it to keep is secure but it is so lovely and soft - perfect for bare shoulders in summer.


PRINTABLE INSTRUCTIONS

Happy Knitting,
Louise

Thanks so much for visiting.  We'd love to have you join us on Facebook and Pinterest too.




Disclaimer: We are all part of one big crafting community so please do not sell our patterns or claim them as your own. You are free to do what you wish with finished items but if you sell them online, please link back to us for pattern credit. Please use your own images if advertising an item for sale from our patterns.  We are not expert pattern designers and believe knitting and crochet is a wonderful art form.  Therefore, many of the ways we create things may not be according to established methods.

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