Wednesday, 29 May 2013

Catch-My-Eye Cowl

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On Mother’s Day, my Dad and I were having a very technical discussion on the best way to wind some very recalcitrant Araucania yarn.  The skeins seemed to twist and knot on the swift and we were trying to figure out why.  In an attempt to sort the issue out, I grabbed a skein of completely different wool that always behaved itself to show that the swift normally wound wool beautifully.

This skein caught my Mum’s eye and she marvelled at the brightness and vibrancy of the colours.  I made a quick note whilst elbow deep in tangles – 1 vibrant cowl for Mum.


I must say from the outset that I am not a swatcher of wool.   Over the years I know that my tension is pretty much spot on and if I follow the wool and needle directions, I am pretty confident of achieving the desired result.  This wool was untested though and I wanted to make sure that I picked a stitch that would best show off the variegations so I made a few samples and decided on a very simple basket weave stitch.  

Fitzbirch is going through a bit of a weaving theme lately.  We've been spinning, dyeing and weaving so perhaps, subconsciously, knitting had to be incorporated there somewhere.  Although, given half a chance, I would incorporate knitting into everything.

Materials Required

The wool was an impulse buy from ebay.  
100% wool from inner mongolia would you believe.
The nearest equivalent wool would be an 8ply (DK) variegated. 

250 yards (150g).
Circular 4.00mm needles

Pattern

Cast on 166 stitches.  Join in the round being careful not to twist it.
Row 1:  K4, P4 to end
Row 2-4: Repeat Row 1
Row 5 & 6: Knit
Row 7: P4, K4 to end
Row 8 -10: Repeat Row 7
Row 11 & 12: Knit.

These 12 rows form the basket weave pattern

Repeat the previous 12 rows 5 more times.

Cast off and Voila!   One vibrant cowl.

Now that it's in the post on the way to my Mum, I can get back to my tangled Araucania.

Happy Knitting,
Louise 


Thanks so much for visiting.  We'd love to have you join us on Facebook , Pinterest  & Ravelry too.

More cowls and scarves from Fitzbirch



Disclaimer: We are all part of one big crafting community so please do not sell our patterns or claim them as your own. You are free to do what you wish with finished items but if you sell them online, please link back to us for pattern credit. Please use your own images if advertising an item for sale from our patterns.  We are not expert pattern designers and believe knitting and crochet is a wonderful art form.  Therefore, many of the ways we create things may not be according to established methods.





Monday, 27 May 2013

Oh-Sew-Easy Drawstring Bag

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I just can't seem to get enough Fat Quarters.  To me it's as if I could have a little teaspoon of every flavour of ice-cream, but transfer that feeling to fabric.  From sweet little patterns to bold prints, I'm quite sure I could easily fill a craft room with fabric samples -  if it wasn't for my outright lack of craft room that is <sigh>.  

This is a very simple bag to make that's all straight lines (my favourite type of sewing) and in fact, I didn't even bother to take measurements, just a few brave cuts here and there and then onto the sewing machine it went.
  
I decided on a fully lined bag and ended up using three fat quarters in total.  I cut three identical rectangles, one from each fabric, leaving enough fabric remaining on the edge and top of the fat quarters to be able to produce stripes for the front of the bag..

I chose two rectangles for the lining and with right sides facing sewed three sides together leaving the top open.  

For the front of the bag, I sewed thick strips from the edges I had discarded when I cut my original rectangles, and once sewn these were trimmed to the same size as the already cut rectangles. I then attached my newly sewn front to the back outside of the bag, with right sides facing of course,  and trimmed the length of this outer shell so that it was slightly shorter than the lining.  It was then a simple case of putting the lining into the outer shell and folding the top of the lining over to form a cuff on the top of the bag.

Sewing the casing for the ribbon
I decided at this point to test out one of the fancier stitches on my sewing machine.  I love the added oomph a bit of stitching can bring!

Once the cuff has been sewn in place it was time to insert the ribbon.  I used a large crochet hook for this usually tiresome job.  By tying the ribbon around the hook and threading through the cuff in reverse everything was quickly in place and the bag was ready to use.

Before ballet gear took over
While I had originally envisaged this to be a bag for transporting library books, at the moment it has the much more odorous task of getting ballet leotards and tights to class.   I think I might have to start thinking about making another one for the library books...


Happy sewing

Deb


Disclaimer: We are all part of one big crafting community so please do not sell our patterns or claim them as your own. You are free to do what you wish with finished items but if you sell them on line, please link back to us for pattern credit. Please use your own images if advertising an item for sale from our patterns.  We are not expert pattern designers and believe knitting and crochet is a wonderful art form.  Therefore, many of the ways we create things may not be according to established methods.





Saturday, 25 May 2013

Nordic Tea Cosy

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There are a lot of whimsical little sayings that try to embody the nature of a sister.  Some are cute ..  some are funny but let me give you mine.  

'A sister is someone who sends you a Nordic Tea Cosy pattern when she knows you have a thing for fairisle and tea cosies.'  

.. Thanks Deb, much appreciated.





The cosy was featured in the UK Womens Weekly knitting and crochet edition for November of 2012

The pattern was one of those that makes you drop all other knitting projects and laugh aloud when you discover that you have everything you need in your yarn stash.

However, as with a number of knitting patterns I come across, I modified it somewhat.
The first modification was on line one.  It said   'Sides - make 2'.  I think not.  I am not a sewer-upper of things. 

It was knitted top down - another modification coming.  I wanted to knit this one bottom up.  

My modified pattern means that I would knit the body of the tea cosy by knitting the bottom in the round, separating for each side and then re-joining them using DPN's when I got to the top.  It's pretty much my standard cosy pattern.  

Also the pattern looked like it was designed for a rather tall tea pot.  Mine was slightly more rotund so some modifications finishing it off would also be called for. 


Materials

1 ball of 8ply red yarn of your choice.
1 ball of 8ply white yarn of your choice
Set of 4.00mm circular needles
Set of 4.00mm DPN's

Pattern

Using circular needles, cast on 94 stitches.

Using the graph below (copyright UK Women's Weekly), knit up to row 9.
Row 10:  Continue in Knit pattern for 47 stitches and then turn your knitting.  At this point, you can either leave the remaining 47 stitches on the needle, (I quite often use a circular needle even when knitting flat so it is easy to just leave them on), or transfer them to a stitch holder.  Continue on these 47 stitches until you have completed the graph.

Coopyright UK Womens Weekly

Once completed, place these needles on a stitch holder,  join yarn to remaining 47 stitches that have been held on the needle and continue the pattern until completed.
You will have2 identical sides that are joined at the bottom.


At this stage I blocked the cosy when it was flat.  
Fairisle and stranded knitting need to be blocked and it is much easier to do it now.


The best way to do it is to pin it out on your blocking board pattern side down.  Spray with water until quite damp and then gently ease the knitting into shape 
- a bit like a woolly massage.  Leave it until it is completely dry.  

Row 39:  Using the same size DPN's, and red yarn,  join your 94 stitches in the round and place a stitch marker to mark the beginning of the round.  K2tog to end of row.  (47 stitches remain.)

Row 40:  Using white yarn, K to end

Row 41:   K2 red, K1 white to end.

Row 42:  Using white yarn K2tog to last stitch, K (24 stitches remain)

Row 43:  Using red yard K2tog (12 stitches remain)

Row 44:  Using red yarn, K2tog (6 stitches remain).  

To finish - cut yarn leaving a tail and thread this tail through the remaining stitches, pull firmly and secure.

Pom Pom - The easiest way to make a pom pom is with a fork.  This link shows you how and a fork pom pom is the perfect size for a tea cosy.  Make 2 pom poms and attach securely to the cosy.

Time to pop the kettle on.

Happy knitting,
Louise

Thanks so much for visiting.  We'd love to have you join us on Facebook , Pinterest  & Ravelry too.

More tea cosies from Fitzbirch

Loom Knit Tea Cosy
Button Rose Tea Cosy
Christmas Tea Cosy
Posy Cosy





Wednesday, 22 May 2013

How to recycle socks ..

Pin It I can only describe my recent discovery with horror.  I had knitted my partner Peter, a pair of socks.  The yarn was lovely.  Very smooth and silky, not the slightest bit scratchy and quite formal looking.  Just right for work - or so I thought.  A few weeks ago I discovered these socks in the bottom of the dogs basket.

I quickly snatched them out and asked why the dog had them?  He then sheepishly said that they were too uncomfortable to wear.  The wool was too slippery and they kept falling down so he took them off whilst sitting at the dining room table and forgot about them.  However, our dog hadn't.


Fortunately, the dog didn't like them either for when I inspected them, they were perfectly intact although, not smelling the best.  None the less, I was furious.  This was no way for good quality sock wool to be treated and once I had overcome my feelings of betrayal, I washed them (twice) and set about rescuing them.



Going ........... Going ............Gone!
I used my wool winder to wind the wool directly from the clean socks and now I had a ball to use for something else.  

Fast forward a few weeks to our camping holiday.  I made a very simple pair of fingerless mittens and I thought that this sock wool would be perfect for another pair.


I asked my son if he would like some.  

"No, not ever" was his response.  
'Never?" I asked.  
"Never, ever" he replied.  
Surely this was a bit harsh.  It's just a pair of fingerless mittens after all and I know there is not much call for them except in the deepest, darkest weeks of winter here in Australia.  
I tried to reason with him - "You will be catching the bus in winter - it will be very cold".  
I just got the 'look'.  You know the one that teenagers give you when there are no words to describe just how painful you are being as a parent - so I let it be.

I thought I would knit them though and give them to someone else - someone a bit more appreciative or someone with colder hands.


They don't take long to knit .. 



Pattern

Using DPN's Cast on 54 (62, 70) stitches and join in the round.
Set up a K2, P2 rib pattern and knit for 2cm
Knit in stockingette for 8cm (9cm, 10cm)
Place 15 (17, 19) onto a separate needle or, using a separate yarn sew through the stitches and pull firmly.
Continue knitting for a further 8cm (9cm, 10cm)
Set up a K2, P2 rib pattern and knit for 2cm
Cast off loosely.

Pick up remaining 15 (17, 19) stitches making sure to 'pick up' an extra 4 stitches along the inside of the thumb.
Knit for a further 4cm (5cm, 6cm) and cast off loosely.

I then went back to my son who very graciously agreed to wear them so I can photograph them.  He looked at them long and hard.  Maybe he's decided that he could wear them after all?  

I shall just leave them lying around to see if he takes them.  If they end up in the dog's basket again though, there will be tears.

Happy knitting
Louise


Thanks so much for visiting.  We'd love to have you join us on Facebook and Pinterest too.




Monday, 20 May 2013

A whole bag full of potential

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It's recently come to mind that opening a bag filled with wool, for which you have no specific plans, can be likened to that moment when you hold your newborn and to your amazement discover that this little person that's just entered the world is filled with more potential than you ever thought possible. They could become something and someone truly amazing and depending on their will (and yours) you may just be able to shape them into a package that you find to be more than tolerable and society in general finds pleasing...and so it is with wool.  

In the lead up to Mother's Day this year I had dropped many an unsubtle hint as to what I would like for the celebration.  The children are not involved in this process as I find such a joy in opening presents that they have thought of completely by themselves and are within their limited budgets or handmade, but for my husband I have no qualms about inviting him to spend a little more and in a direction that I have gently encouraged.  My gentle encouragement generally starts with leaving pages from websites open on the computer and progresses through to "If you're wondering what to get me for Mother's Day, I'd really like a..."







This year one of the pages I  left open for my husband to "accidentally" stumble across was unsurprisingly an online wool shop and while he didn't take me up on the idea as in his words, he was too overwhelmed with choice, come the big day I was encouraged to place an order of my own choosing. And so it was that I spent a good part of an hour deciding on colours and yarn choices.  At the back of my mind I had a vague whim that I would be looking to make some cushion covers and some Britannia themed homewares, but like children, I've come to understand that there is the potential for this yarn to become anything (and in the end,  hopefully it will be more than tolerable and something that society in general finds pleasing).

Happy crafting

Deb

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Friday, 17 May 2013

Loom Knit Tea Cosy

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While most people seem to have delicate little tea pots, mine seems huge in comparison.  I think it perhaps says a lot about my penchant for tea, but a tea pot this big really does require a cosy to keep the contents warm as the pot is slowly drained.

Rather than knit a cosy in the usual way, I thought I would try making one using a loom/knifty knitter.  They are wonderful at creating round shapes and it was only the really-quite-easy-but-seems-quite-tricky process of making slots for the handle and spout that is anything out of the usual.

As the finished item generally ends up being slightly smaller than the loom it's knitted on, I chose the loom that best fitted my pot, in my set this ended up being the green loom, but I know this can vary depending on manufacturer.  The yarn is Bella Baby Buttercup, which I've used before and love its softness and pastel shades.  It's a 4ply baby weight and this project is knitted using two strands together and I decided on pastel lavender and pink.

For my cosy I started with Five rows of Rib Stitch and then the rest of the cosy is knitted in one row of e-wrap, one row purl.  We have links to some wonderful video instruction for casting on and rib stitch in our blog post Knifty Loom Knit Leg Warmers.

Once the rib and first row of e-wrap are complete, it's time to make the holes for the spout and handle.  At the horizontal peg, rather than continue knitting, reverse and using purl stitch go back over the stitches from the last row, until you reach the peg directly opposite the horizontal peg/ (eg.  I knit going to the right of the loom, so at the marker peg I stop and reverse, meaning I'm now knitting to the left of the loom. and continue halfway around the loom before stopping.  You are essentially going back and forward on the loom, rather than knitting in the round.  Once you have knitted one half of the cosy - the length should be enough to reach the brim of the teapot, detach the wool (you can sew in the ends later) and attach to the other half of the cosy and knit in the same way.  Once both sides are equal it's time to knit in the round again.  Complete enough rows to ensure the top of your pot will be completely covered.

To cast off, cut the yarn leaving enough to thread through each stitch of the loom, with a little extra.  Using a large needle, sew through each stitch on the loom, detaching it from the pegs as you go.  When every stitch has been threaded, gently  pull the yarn until the top has closed.







 


To decorate, I used some flowers made on a flower loom kit - I love that it's so pretty and feminine and just a little bit shabby chic.

Happy loom knitting 

Deb




Other FitzBirch loom knit projects:
Knifty Loom Knit Leg Warmers
Loom Knit Gauntlets
Loom Knit Market Bag
Loom Knit Remote Control Holder
Loom Knit Socks
Charity Knitting



Disclaimer: We are all part of one big crafting community so please do not sell our patterns or claim them as your own. You are free to do what you wish with finished items but if you sell them online, please link back to us for pattern credit. Please use your own images if advertising an item for sale from our patterns.  We are not expert pattern designers and believe knitting and crochet is a wonderful art form.  Therefore, many of the ways we create things may not be according to established methods.

Wednesday, 15 May 2013

Bunker Bay Cowl

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Araucania Ruca is lovely by the waters of Bunker Bay
Knitting whilst on holiday is one of life's most pleasant pastimes.

However, the times between knitting need to be filled in with activities and this morning we went out for a coffee (and cake, a delicious orange/almond cake - divine).
Whilst we were waiting for our coffee's and staring out across the bay, I was struck by how much the water reminded me of the wool I am using on my hitherto unnamed project.  The same blues, pale aqua's and slight greens ...

I have been  toying with some 'ocean' themed names .. Sea grass cowl, ocean ripples but they didn't seem quite right - until we had coffee at Bunker Bay.  This delightful spot on the extreme South West of Western Australia is rapidly developing into a tourist mecca and it is easy to see why - just as it's easy to see why my new cowl now has a name.


Bunker Bay Cowl

This cowl is a long, lined, cable cowl that wraps around the neck for a decidedly warm feel.

Material Required.

.. Araucania Ruca 550m   (220grams)
..4.00mm circular needle
..Waste yarn for provisional cast on

Instructions.

Using your preferred provisional cast on method, cast on 266 stitches.  I always use the crochet method mainly because it is very quick and easy.  This you tube clip is very straight forward to follow.

Once you have 266  stitches, attach the working yarn for the set up row.

Place a stitch marker to indicate the beginning of the row.  

15 rows of circular knitting counted

I always find it tricky to keep track of rows when knitting circularly.  I purchased a packet of 500 mini hair ties and I use these as my markers.  As they are very thin, I add one everytime I reach the end of the row.  The cable pattern in this cowl is repeated every 6 rows.  I know that when I have collected 6 stitch markers, it's time to cable.  They are also very useful to keep matching sets of DPN's together not to mention their intended purpose - keeping unruly hair tidy.
If I need to keep track of a lot of rows, I collect 10 and then like a Chinese abacus, I will move one of the markers one stitch to the left. As you can see from the picture on the right, I am currently on row 15.  The marker to left of the first stitch indicates 10, and the 5 on the right add to 15.  If you need to keep track of over 100 rows, then it is simply a case of adding another tie to the left of the next stitch to indicate 100.


ABBREVIATIONS
6CF  -  Slip 3 stitches onto a cable needle and hold in the front of your work. K3 then K3 from cable needle


How to 6CF without a cable needle.

I am a big fan of cabling without a cable needle and I thought I would show you how it is done.



Step 1.  Identify the stitches that will be used in the cable.  In this case, it is the 6 stitches on the LHS needle up to the purl stitch.

Step 2.  Slip all 6 stitches purlwise onto the RHS.

Step 3.  Using the LHS needle, pick up the first of the 3 slipped stitches as shown.  The LHS needle has picked up the stitches in front of the work making it a front cable.  A back cable is simply a case of picking up the same 3 stitches, but from the back.  Gently slide all 6 stitches to the end of the RHS needle.

Step 4.  Using the thumb and middle finger on your left hand, firmly squeeze your knitting and pull the RHS needle back to release the stitches.  DON'T PANIC.  I know that you now have stitches off the needle but they aren't going anywhere because of the 'firm squeeze' you are still applying.

Step 5. & 6  Quickly re-insert the RHS needle into the stitches. With a bit of practise, this motion becomes very fluid. These stitches now need to come to the front so using the LHS needle, pick up/slip these stitches starting with the one closest to the end of the RHS needle. All 6 stitches are back on the LHS needle but the order has changed.

Step 7 & 8.  Knit the 6 stitches and you are finished.

When I am working on a piece that requires a lot of cabling, I find that this method saves me a lot of time.  The yarn for this project is very lustrous (made from sugar cane would you believe) and there is nothing more frustrating than a cable needle that keeps falling out of your work.

Row 1:           K6, P1 to end 
Row 2 - 5:      Repeat row 1
Row 6:           6CF, P1, K6, P1 to end
Row 7:           K6, P1 to end
Rows 8 - 11:  Repeat row 7
Row 12:         6CF, P1 to end.

Rows 1 - 12 form the pattern and are repeated a further 4 times (5 patterns in total).

Rows 60 - 105.  Knit 6, P1 to end.  This forms the inside lining of the cowl.

Row 106:       Undo the provisional cast on and, using the 3 needle bind off method, cast off all stitches.

The cowl can be worn long over tops or wrapped around your neck for warmth when wearing a coat.

All in all, a good holiday knit.


Happy knitting and happy holidays,
Louise

Thanks so much for visiting.  We'd love to have you join us on Facebook , Pinterest  & Ravelry too.


More cowls and scarves from Fitzbirch




Disclaimer: We are all part of one big crafting community so please do not sell our patterns or claim them as your own. You are free to do what you wish with finished items but if you sell them online, please link back to us for pattern credit. Please use your own images if advertising an item for sale from our patterns.  We are not expert pattern designers and believe knitting and crochet is a wonderful art form.  Therefore, many of the ways we create things may not be according to established methods.


Monday, 13 May 2013

Delayed Dyeing

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If there's someone in your life who's a bit partial to doing some craft, my handy hint to you is to make sure that at each birthday or Christmas there's a little something (or two) that they can knit, weave, sew or make.  When Louise, my sister and fellow blogger, mentioned that her first forays into learning how to spin hadn't quite matched the standard she was hoping for and the wool produced  wasn't behaving as it should (you can read about it here) , I got a bit excited for my daughter, whose birthday was fast approaching.  My parents had already purchased a small weaving loom and Louise's wonderfully textured yarn would be perfect for a beginner weaver.  Louise then went a step further and added some dyes into the mix so that when the gift arrived it was a wonderful box of craftiness.

While my daughter would normally leap into a project like this as quickly as she could open the wrapping paper, an unfortunate injury meant that crafting was out of the question for her actual birthday and the weeks following.  It was with joyful relief when the cast on her arm was finally removed and the long awaited dyeing could begin.




Louise had included a variety of colours from the Gaywool Dyes range in the parcel and the instructions called for the wool to be boiled for half an hour.  While I know that my daughter would have jumped right in and used whatever kitchen implements she could find, I was a little concerned that my good saucepans and specially sought out kitchen tongs would never be the same again once they had come into contact with the dye, so off we went to the local disount store to buy the cheapest saucepan that we could find and found an old pair of chopsticks in the kitchen draw which we thought would do a wonderful job of lifting, stirring and prodding the wool as it absorbed the colour.  

As it turned out I really needn't have worried about staining as everything rinsed perfectly clean, but it does feel it little more professional to have our own set of implements specifically for dyeing.  I  can't praise the Gaywool Dyes enough, they're very easy to use and the strength of colour is really wonderful, to the point that I would probably use less of the dye next time to produce a more pastel shade.


The dyeing process:
1. Bring a pot of water to the boil.  There should be enough water to cover the amount of wool you will be dyeing.
2. Mix the required amound of dye (in this instance we used a lid full of Gaywool "Willow") into a small amount of hot water and when dissolved add to the saucepan of boiling water.
3. Take the wool and wet with warm water and a small amount of kitchen detergent and then place in dye bath.
4. Gently turn the wool over or lift the wool out of the bath and replace during the first four minutes.  
5. Keep the water at boiling or near boiling for a total of half an hour
6. Rinse in warm water until water runs clear, wring out as much as possible and hang on the line to dry.




At this point we were hoping the local bird population wouldn't see our wool hanging on the line as a wonderfully convenient and colourful lining for their nests!











 ...and here is the finished product.  We were thrilled with the final colour and can't wait to start weaving with it, but that's a blog update for another day.

Happy crafting

Deb

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Friday, 10 May 2013

Stolen Moments Crochet Throw

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When I first saw this throw from Red Heart, it was aptly named the "Flower Throw", and I couldn't help but take note of the description which  boldly stated that it was a "great project for those stolen moments when you're waiting for your child's activities or an appointment."  Given that I seem to spend most afternoons waiting in the car for one activity or another to come to an end, I thought this would be the perfect project to fit in with my lifestyle. Something I could put together piece by piece on a daily basis which would naturally mean it would be finished in no time...



I was lucky enough to receive some lovely wool and Knit Pro Crochet hooks for my birthday and chose Bendigo Woollen Mills "Luxury" yarn in shades of Bark, Stone and Koala, plus "Classic" Tasman Blue for a splash of colour amongst the neutral tones.





Needing a total of 82 crochet flowers in total, I did the Math and worked out that if I made five flowers a day, the whole throw would be finished in only 16.4 days, plus a day or two for blocking and sewing.  It was going to be brilliantly quick!

I can tell you that I managed about three or four days in the beginning where five flowers per day quickly worked their way off my crochet hook, but from then on it was pretty slow going.  There were times when a whole week (or two, or three) managed to sneak past me where not one flower was made.

In fact it took me closer to 260ish days to finish this throw, a whole lot more than the 16.4 days I had originally calculated.  My daughter finished primary school, Christmas came and went,  we took a holiday and all the while at the back of my mind was the thought "I really need to get on with that throw". 

It's not as if it was difficult to crochet or frustrating in any way.  The wool was lovely to work with, I adored the colours and the pattern soon found its own rhythm as I worked away, it was just I couldn't put my mind to it and there were so many other things that needed doing. Finally I decided I just had to push through and over a few weeks worked diligently away at completing the flowers.  It was a grand day indeed when the crocheting and blocking was complete.




...and then it took me another whole month to get around to sewing it together!

It was worth the wait though, don't you think?

Happy crocheting

Deb


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Wednesday, 8 May 2013

Peony & Lime Cowl

Pin It The weather in England at the moment is supposed to be freezing.  We've seen the news about record snow fall and it looks grim.  On the other hand, we have been having the most marvellous Indian summer and scarves, mittens and hats are the last thing that anyone is thinking about.

However, a very dear friend is finishing work tomorrow to pursue a whole new path of marriage and writing and will soon jet off to England.  It's the perfect excuse to knit something warm for her.  She has lovely visions of sitting in a garret and spending her days with her note pads and pens.  From what I hear though, garrets & attics can be very cold and England in the spring time is still considered freezing by Australian standards.

I had recently purchased some gorgeous Debbie Bliss 'Bella'.  80% cotton, 15% silk and 5% cashmere.  It's deliciously soft and I was keen to make something using the two vibrant colours together.  A cowl would be perfect for 2 reasons - it would be highly practical and I love knitting them.


Provisional Cast On
I decided on Madelinetosh's 'Brick Road Cowl'.  This is not a free pattern.  The cost is $6.00 but the premise of the pattern is quite straight forward.  Cast on using a provisional cast on, knit 8 inches of your pattern, swap colours to reverse the pattern and knit a further 8 inches and then cast off using the 3 needle bind off.  I decided on the double length version to enable it to be wrapped snugly around your neck.  The stitch used is the 'brick' stitch and it shows off the 2 colours superbly.


3 Needle Bind Off
It took a bit longer to knit than I anticipated but the end result is worth it.  So much so, that I am going to knit one for myself.  Although, I always say that and I always end up giving them away as gifts.  I am determined this time!

The Lime and Peony Cowl should be a wonderful way to brighten things up should the weather take a turn for the worse - which it always does in England.

Good luck Danielle, we shall miss you!


Peony & Lime Cowl

Louise

Thanks so much for visiting.  We'd love to have you join us on Facebook , Pinterest  & Ravelry too.


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